Taipei

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Project Management Schedule: Seminar 14, Group 3: Taipei Our group has been in constant communication via Brock Email. We have been using email to split up the group work and make sure everyone is on the same page with the project. We have decided to split up the chapters 1. Intro - Adrienne 2. Global- Courtney 3. Political- Courtney 4.Population- Kelly 5.Migration- Kelly 6. Social- Tavia 7. Culture- Harman We have decided that Adrienne, Tavia and Harman will also be in charge of editing the work after we have all completed our part and make sure that all of the work flows well together. We have decided that all of the chapters are to be completed by November 28th, this gives Adrienne, Tavia and Harman the time afterwards to edit and make sure we have completed everything. Seminar 14, Group 3: Kelly, Harman, Tavia, Courtney, Adrienne

Contents

[edit] Globalization

Globalization is an accelerating process involving flows, that encompass a large number of the worlds spaces, lead to increasing integration and inter connectivity among those spaces. Taipei is considered to be a semi-peripheral city, as it lands somewhere between core and peripheral. The city is dependent but still in some cases underdeveloped even though it has had significant changes in levels of industrialization.

[edit] Impact of Globalization

Over the past decades globalization has had a major effect on Taipei including financial stability, policy capacity and production organization of economies [1]. Taipei along with other cities in Taiwan has been building their economies by using the available domestic resources in order to fulfill their goal of economic growth [2].Earlier this year, the Premier of Taiwan, Jiang Yi-huah stated at the national conference on economic and trade affairs that took place in Taipei that globalization is unavoidable and they need to come up with a strategy to deal with it [3]. He also acknowledged the concerns of globalization and how it could affect the flow of capital and lead to a widening gap between the rich and the poor [4]. In light of the impact of globalization on Taipei, the government has begun to operate the tax system more effectively and the new tax reforms are attracting more overseas business to Taipei [5]. The government is also hoping to boost spending on infrastructure despite the tight budget, which will allow the economy to continue to grow.

[edit] Economy

The city of Taipei has had quick economic development and is holding one of the largest foreign exchange reserves (FER) in the world. Taipei’s main industries include the urban service industry, high-tech industry and technology-intensive industry [6]. In order to keep up with the competition the Department of Economic Development started to release ‘Taipei Economic Quarterly” which allows investors the opportunity to look at the economical and financial information related to the city. GDP is continually expanding in Taipei as it holds the thirteenth largest GDP in world cities with a gross domestic product of $160 billion US dollars. The GDP per capita in Taipei is also second highest in Asia, only behind Tokyo, with a GDP per capita of $48,000 US dollars [7].

[edit] Foreign Trade

The reason behind the large economic growth in Taipei is because of foreign trade and Taipei is considered to be the world’s seventeenth largest exporter, as they had $305.1 billion US dollars shipped around the world in 2013 (Workman, 2014)[8]. The top five trading partners based on the highest dollar value imported in the year 2013 include China, Hong Kong, United States, Singapore and Japan. These trading partners were all able to import over US$20 billion each [9]

[edit] Imports and Exports

Taipei’s economy focuses a great deal on exports as opposed to importing. This could be the reason behind the great economic development in the city. The Importers and Exporters Association of Taipei (EIAT) represents the businesses within the city that are engaged in importing and exporting goods [10]. In Taipei the largest factories that produce textiles and clothing are located in the city. They manufacture mostly electronics which include products, components, machinery and equipment. Undoubtedly, the electronic sector is by far the most important industry in Taipei, as they are the largest supplier of the computer chip, computer memory, networking equipment, and consumer electronics. Imports in Taipei are mostly raw materials and capital goods, as well as importing most of there energy needs. Taipei's population can be segregated into several different categories [11]

[edit] Politics

[edit] Political History

In 1945 the Taipei City Government was established with ten administrative districts, under those districts boroughs and neighborhoods were also established, 2014.[12] In 1949 the central government of Taiwan was moved to Taipei and in that year they also had the first city council, which ultimately aided in the beginning of democracy. In the 1960’s the military, culture and economics were all centered in Taipei, which advanced the politics greatly [13]

[edit] Administration

In Taipei City Government, there is currently 22 departments within 5 branches. The departments include: civil affairs, cultural affairs, economic development, education, environmental protection, Feitsu reservoir administration, finance, fire department, health, information and tourism, information technology, labour, land, legal affairs, military services, police, public works, rapid transit system, social welfare, sports, transportation and urban development [14]

[edit] Taipei City Council

The Taipei City Council is the current elected council at the municipal level [15]. They have held office since November 2010 during the Republic of China Municipal election[16]. The current head of the Taipei City Council, known as the speaker, is Wu Bi-chu [17].


[edit] Cultural Geography

[edit] Media

Taipei has more than 170 daily newspapers available in different languages. These newspapers include award winning newspapers like Liberty Times, Power News and the Taipei Times. However, the three major daily newspapers that are published in Mandarin are The China Times, the United Daily News,and the Liberty Times. These newspapers have become a great source of entertainment,sports and lifestyle to people.The newspapers are highly recognized for their attractive graphics and layouts. Since 1999, the famous newspaper, Taipei Times, has achieved great success in a very short time as they are published in English and it has gained main customers attention. Most of the main newspapers come out in the capital city, Taipei and are then distributed to other towns and cities. Also,for the better convenience of the people, the newspapers are gone online due to the increasing technology.The quality of newspapers and magazines has improved dramatically due to the increasing use of color and graphics. [18]


[edit] Entertainment

With the increasing technology, sources of entertainment have increased rapidly. However, the major source of entertainment till date is still the old "idiot box", television. Public television in Taipei has gone undergone a major recognition since 1998.The rapid development of Hong Kong industry became on of a major influence for television in Taiwan. Most of the channels play dramas that have become popular in Southeast Asia. Taiwanese dramas are well known overseas although they are produced in Mandarin. The mostly cover genres include comedy, romance, crime, medicine and family. The subject matter in the dramas include first teenage experiences and love triangles. The first phenomenon started with Meteor Garden [1] in 2001, which is the adaption of the Japanese manga. Other dramas like It started with a kiss, Love Buffet and Peach Girl are based on Japanese manga. Many famous actors like Mike He, Jerry Yan, Joe Chang and Vanness Wu are well known all around the world for their works.Taiwanese dramas are mostly shot in the capital city, Taipei. Taiwanese dramas have become well known across the world and continue to gain fame.

[edit] Population

Taipei's population can be segregated into several different categories. Taipei City which is the Capital of Taiwan has an estimated population of 2,695,007 people[19]. Taipei City is part of a metropolitan area called the Taipei–Keelung metropolitan area which has a total population size of 7,028,583 people [20]. This metropolitan area encompasses two other cities named New Taipei City and Keelung city[21].

[edit] Migration

Taiwan's migration rate is 0.9 migrant(s)/1,000 population [22] with over 46,563 immigrants coming into Taipai at the end of October 2013[23]. A large section of these immigrants were mainland Chinese spouses[24]. Recently Taipei's government has been very open in accepting new immigrants even offering courses and centers to better integrate new immigrants into the society[25].

[edit] Social Geography

Taipei's identity varies throughout the city and its various districts. Its societal views are based upon political, economical and traditional ways that continuously change due to immigration and foreigners. These changes have altered society in the past few years with an increase in marriages to different cultures [26]. This is due to the people of Taiwan in general altering their view of the world and their society. In response to this Taiwan has created various programs that allow new individuals to adapt to the districts, lifestyle and language.

[edit] Gender

Both men and women are held to different standards throughout Taipei that also vary when it comes to foreigners. Much like the rest of the world women's rights still have a long way to go as Taipei still holds traditional gender roles true. Statistics show in Taiwan 74 percent of women are still responsible for being the main caregiver of the family. Around 60 percent of the household responsibilities are completed by women and very few men help out [27]. When it comes to women in the workforce on average they are paid 16.1 cents less than men. When looking at the amount of work women would have to work an additional 59 days just to make the same amount as men [28].The adultery law still exists in Taiwan and is supposed to protect women from other women and their husbands mistresses. In the past few years the amount of women being charged under this law seems to have increased [29]. This increase has more to do with speculation of people being unfaithful than a concrete increase in philandering. Women seem to be more forgiving of their husband cheating than of the mistress they were cheating with causing an increase in court cases of adultery. When it comes to inheritance in the court of law both women and men have the same right to accept. The issue is traditionally it is the male that is allowed to pass on property so females are pressured by their families to waive their right to their inheritance to allow the male collect their inheritance. Statistics that were completed by the Ministry of Finance in 2011 actually show that only 36.7 percent of men had waived their right to inheritance while 63.3 percent of women waived their right.

Changes were recently made to the Gender Equality Act that will increase paternity leave to five days for those who have spouses in labour. Women who are pregnant will also be given more days for pre-birth doctors' appointments. Another change included is the allowance of 1 menstrual day each month with half pay as long as there have not been more than 3 days per year[30].

[edit] Aboriginal

Taipei is home to many aboriginal/aborigine groups which comprise of 15,235 people of the population [31]. The majority of this population are a part of the Amis tribe. These tribes also tend to be located in the districts of Neihu, Wenshan and Nangang [32]. Years ago being a part of an aboriginal tribe in Taipei was not something to be honoured by and many aborigines would withhold this information from others. By doing this they were forced to hide their identity due to the view society has of them. This was due to political and cultural rules they were forced to abide by limiting the self-expression of these tribes. Over the last 20 years political and cultural restrictions were reduced allowing the aboriginal tribes of Taipei to express themselves more freely as well as build upon the nature of their tribes [33]. The younger individuals of Taiwan seem to like the idea of the people in these tribes abiding by their heritage; while those seen as traditional Chinese individuals have begun to look at the aboriginals and their views in a more positive light [34].

[edit] Notes and References

  1. Chao. (2002). Impact of Globalization on Asian Developing Countries. Retrieved Dec 2, 2014 http://www.globalpes.com/global/challengeofglobalization.htm
  2. Chao. (2002). Impact of Globalization on Asian Developing Countries. Retrieved: Dec 2, 2014. http://www.globalpes.com/global/challengeofglobalization.htm
  3. Min-wei, W. (2014) Globalization Strategy Needed. Retrieved: Dec 2, 2014
  4. Min-wei, W. (2014) Globalization Strategy Needed. Retrieved: Dec 2, 2014. http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2014/07/27/2003596042
  5. Min-wei, W. (2014) Globalization Strategy Needed. Retrieved: Dec 2, 2014. http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2014/07/27/2003596042
  6. Taipei Economic Overview (2014). Retrieved: Dec 2, 2014. http://english.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=1093242&ctNode=29649&mp=100002
  7. Retrieved: Dec 2, 2014. http://english.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=1093242&ctNode=29649&mp=100002
  8. Workman, D. (2014) Taipei's Fastest- Growing Import Partners. Retrieved: Dec 4, 2014. http://www.worldstopexports.com/taiwans-fastest-growing-import-partners/2620
  9. Workman, D. (2014) Taipei's Fastest- Growing Import Partners. Retrieved: Dec 4, 2014. http://www.worldstopexports.com/taiwans-fastest-growing-import-partners/2620
  10. Workman, D. (2014) Taipei's Fastest- Growing Import Partners. Retrieved: Dec 4, 2014. http://www.worldstopexports.com/taiwans-fastest-growing-import-partners/2620
  11. Workman, D. (2014) Taipei's Fastest- Growing Import Partners. Retrieved: Dec 4, 2014. http://www.worldstopexports.com/taiwans-fastest-growing-import-partners/2620
  12. Taipei City Government. Retrieved Dec 5, 2014. http://english.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=1084524&ctNode=29490&mp=100002
  13. Taipei City Government. Retrieved Dec 5, 2014. http://english.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=1084524&ctNode=29490&mp=100002
  14. Taipei City Government. Retrieved Dec 5, 2014. http://english.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=1084524&ctNode=29490&mp=100002
  15. Taipei City Government. Retrieved Dec 5, 2014. http://english.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=1084524&ctNode=29490&mp=100002
  16. Taipei City Government. Retrieved Dec 5, 2014. http://english.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=1084524&ctNode=29490&mp=100002
  17. Taipei City Government. Retrieved Dec 5, 2014. http://english.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=1084524&ctNode=29490&mp=100002
  18. Press Reference (2014), Retrieved November 30, 2014. from http://www.pressreference.com/Sw-Ur/Taiwan.html.
  19. Taipei. (2014, October 12). Retrieved December 3, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taipei
  20. Taipei–Keelung metropolitan area. (2014, August 12). Retrieved December 3, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taipei–Keelung_metropolitan_area
  21. Taipei–Keelung metropolitan area. (2014, August 12). Retrieved December 3, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taipei–Keelung_metropolitan_area
  22. Taiwan Net migration rate. (n.d.). Retrieved December 1, 2014, from http://www.indexmundi.com/taiwan/net_migration_rate.html
  23. Demographic Overview. (2014, November 1). Retrieved December 5, 2014, from http://english.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=1084529&ctNode=29491&mp=100002
  24. Demographic Overview. (2014, November 1). Retrieved December 5, 2014, from http://english.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=1084529&ctNode=29491&mp=100002
  25. Demographic Overview. (2014, November 1). Retrieved December 5, 2014, from http://english.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=1084529&ctNode=29491&mp=100002
  26. Demographic Overview. (2014). Retrieved: December 4,2014 from http://english.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=1084529&ctNode=29491&mp=100002
  27. Gender equality in Taiwan still has a long way to go. (2014)Retrieved: December 4,2014. from http://asianewsnet.net/Gender-equality-in-Taiwan-still-has-a-long-way-to--57839.html
  28. Gender equality in Taiwan still has a long way to go. (2014)Retrieved: December 4,2014. from http://asianewsnet.net/Gender-equality-in-Taiwan-still-has-a-long-way-to--57839.html
  29. Gender equality in Taiwan still has a long way to go. (2014)Retrieved: December 4,2014. from http://asianewsnet.net/Gender-equality-in-Taiwan-still-has-a-long-way-to--57839.html
  30. Gender equality in Taiwan still has a long way to go. (2014)Retrieved: December 4,2014. from http://asianewsnet.net/Gender-equality-in-Taiwan-still-has-a-long-way-to--57839.html
  31. Demographic Overview. (2014). Retrieved: December 4,2014 from http://english.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=1084529&ctNode=29491&mp=100002
  32. Demographic Overview. (2014). Retrieved: December 4,2014 from http://english.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=1084529&ctNode=29491&mp=100002
  33. Aborigine people have inhabited Taiwan for thousands of years before the arrival of Chinese settlers. (2012). Retrieved: December 4,2014 from http://www.taiwan-travel-experience.com/aborigine-people.html
  34. Aborigine people have inhabited Taiwan for thousands of years before the arrival of Chinese settlers. (2012). Retrieved: December 4,2014 from http://www.taiwan-travel-experience.com/aborigine-people.html
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